To Juice or Not to Juice - Is Juice Really Healthy?

Have you noticed advertisements for juice fasts? Or seen a juice bar pop up in your neighborhood? If so, you’re not alone.

Juice fasts and juice bars are more popular than ever. Juice fasts promise detoxification, weight loss, and even beautifying. And juice bars have morphed from granola establishments to hip and modern hang outs.

So is the hype true? Is juice really healthy for you?

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Like most things, the answer isn’t so simple.

First, we have to break down the two most popular types of juice - fruit juice and vegetable juice.  When you juice fruit or vegetables, you remove the solid portions and are left with liquid.

In the case of fruit, this is typically a bad thing.

One reason is because the juicing process removes fiber (a vital part) from fruit. Fiber helps keep your digestive system moving AND helps stabilize the natural sugar found in fruit. When you remove the fiber, you ingest the natural sugar in fruit without the blood sugar stabilizing effects of fiber.

Another reason is when you juice, you often consume much more than you would if you were eating the whole fruit. A glass of orange juice can contain as much as FIVE orange’s worth of liquid and sugar. It is pretty easy to swig a glass of OJ (and five orange’s worth of calories and sugar) and barely notice feeling full from it. If you stuck with solid fruit, you would definitely notice feeling full after eating five oranges.

Bottom line: Steer clear of fruit juices.

If you want to juice, vegetable juice is the safer bet.

While you still miss out on the fiber, vegetable juice is lower in sugar compared to its fruit counterpart while allowing you to ingest important nutrients in a concentrated form.

But I suggest sticking to pure and fresh vegetable juice. Many premade vegetable juice cocktails contain added salt or hidden fruit juice.

To juice or not to juice? Fruit is a nay, but vegetables are a yay.

Do you have a burning health question? Send it my way!

In health,
Skye