Are You Making THESE Smoothie Mistakes?

The Case for Smoothies

Are you looking for something that tastes delicious, is easy to digest, and packed full of nutrients? If so, smoothies may be just what you are looking for.

Last week we uncovered the truth about juice. Read more about it here.  

Smoothies are an excellent alternative to juice. This is because they have the pros of juice (easy to drink and digest) with few of the cons.

When you juice, you remove much of the fiber from the fruit and vegetable ingredients. Remember, fiber helps keep your digestive system moving and stabilizes blood sugar.

When you make a smoothie, you retain the beneficial fiber. You also keep your portions in check.

Smoothie .jpeg

Not All Smoothies are Created Equally

Smoothies, like most food, can vary dramatically based on how they are prepared.

I commonly work with people who think they are making wonderfully nutritious smoothies. But when we get down to the details, we discover their smoothies are full of sugar and keeping them from their health goals.

I don’t want this to happen to you! So I compiled the top 5 smoothie mistakes I see people making.

Keep reading to make sure you aren’t making one of these very common mistakes.

Smoothie Mistake #1: Using dodgy protein powders.

This is the MOST common smoothie mistake my client’s make.

Most protein powders do NOT do you any favors.

Basically, the vast majority of protein powders are over priced and ultimately underperform. They are filled with strange protein sources and even stranger additives. Plus, most taste gross. Or the gross taste is masked with tons of sugar or artificial sweeteners (both wellness sabotagers).

There are a few exceptions, but you have to really be purposeful in your purchase.

Still looking to add protein to your smoothies? No problem. Try these whole food protein options:

  • Hemp seeds
  • Chia seeds
  • Nuts
  • Dark green leafy vegetables
  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Silken tofu

Smoothie Mistake #2: Adding fruit juice instead of whole fruit.

It’s tempting to add sweet fruit juice to your smoothies. However, fruit juice adds a whole lot of sugar to your smoothies without the help of blood sugar stabilizing fiber.

Instead of adding fruit juice, add whole fruit! That way you get the great taste and the beneficial qualities of eating the whole food.

Smoothie Mistake #3: Forgetting the green vegetables.

Does the idea of adding spinach or kale to your smoothie gross you out?

It shouldn’t.

A handful or two of green leafy vegetables adds serious nutrition without taking away from the taste.

Does the idea of drinking a green colored smoothie make you cringe? If so, add some dark colored fruit (like blueberries) to mask the color. This is also a great trick for sneaking vegetables into children smoothies.

Smoothie Mistake #4: Using yogurt as the base.

Many smoothie recipes use yogurt as its base.

Why’s this a mistake? There’s so many reasons I could devote an entire post to answering this. Bottomline: most yogurts are full of sugar and odd preservatives that don’t do you any health favors.

If you crave a creamy smoothies, use alternatives to yogurt to get the consistency you desire. Nut milks (like almond or cashew), hemp milk, or flaxseed milk are all great options. Also adding a handful of nuts or a tablespoon of nut butter can up the creamy factor.

Smoothie Mistake #5: Buying expensive premade smoothies.

Store or restaurant smoothies, while tasty, can cost $7 or more per serving. If you’re drinking one day, that’s $49 a week or nearly $2500 a year.

You can easily make homemade and nutritious smoothies for a fraction of the price. And to save time, you can blend up a few at a time and drink them over the next few days.

Good for You Smoothie Recipes?

Looking for mistake-free smoothie recipes? Check out my smoothie recipes.

Glow Getter Smoothie

Skye’s Detox Smoothie

A Better Way Breakfast Smoothie (from The ABC’s of Wellness)

Sending you health, light, and love,

Skye

To Juice or Not to Juice - Is Juice Really Healthy?

Have you noticed advertisements for juice fasts? Or seen a juice bar pop up in your neighborhood? If so, you’re not alone.

Juice fasts and juice bars are more popular than ever. Juice fasts promise detoxification, weight loss, and even beautifying. And juice bars have morphed from granola establishments to hip and modern hang outs.

So is the hype true? Is juice really healthy for you?

Juice.jpeg

Like most things, the answer isn’t so simple.

First, we have to break down the two most popular types of juice - fruit juice and vegetable juice.  When you juice fruit or vegetables, you remove the solid portions and are left with liquid.

In the case of fruit, this is typically a bad thing.

One reason is because the juicing process removes fiber (a vital part) from fruit. Fiber helps keep your digestive system moving AND helps stabilize the natural sugar found in fruit. When you remove the fiber, you ingest the natural sugar in fruit without the blood sugar stabilizing effects of fiber.

Another reason is when you juice, you often consume much more than you would if you were eating the whole fruit. A glass of orange juice can contain as much as FIVE orange’s worth of liquid and sugar. It is pretty easy to swig a glass of OJ (and five orange’s worth of calories and sugar) and barely notice feeling full from it. If you stuck with solid fruit, you would definitely notice feeling full after eating five oranges.

Bottom line: Steer clear of fruit juices.

If you want to juice, vegetable juice is the safer bet.

While you still miss out on the fiber, vegetable juice is lower in sugar compared to its fruit counterpart while allowing you to ingest important nutrients in a concentrated form.

But I suggest sticking to pure and fresh vegetable juice. Many premade vegetable juice cocktails contain added salt or hidden fruit juice.

To juice or not to juice? Fruit is a nay, but vegetables are a yay.

Do you have a burning health question? Send it my way!

In health,
Skye